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St Dubricius Church

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History  of St. Dubricius Church

The parish church is one of the oldest in the Deanery of Ross and Archenfield; Its foundations date from the 9th century and the oldest part goes back to the 13th century.

The church is in the Decorated style of architecture with walls of local sandstone rubble and ashlar and the roof of stone slates.

The bowl of the font is Norman in origin, the lower edge being cut away to octagonal form to fit a 14th or 15th century stem with a square base. The church was enlarged in Victorian times.

Outstanding examples of locally-produced needlecraft and tapestries decorate the church.

St. Dubricius lived in Herefordshire in 6th century and founded monasteries which were centres of learning. Legend has it he had a miraculous birth.

The tulip tree near the south porch is reputed to be over 300 years old and blooms every year in June and July.

WHITCHURCH

Correspondent: Jenny Sparkes jandjsparkes@btinternet.com

Said Eucharist and discussion 11am every Thursday

Aisle Community lunches are on February 12th and 26th at 12.15 in the Aisle. The meals are cooked by Woods of Whitchurch. Come and join us. To book ring 01600 890397

Good Neighbour Coffee mornings

are held at the Memorial Hall. They will be on February 7th and 21st, 10.30 to 12noon. Do join us for coffee and chat (and read the daily papers!).

‘Tea and Chat’ is held in the Aisle at St Dubricius on Thursdays from
2 – 4pm. This is

open to all and a warm welcome awaits you.

Open Afternoon is held in the Aisle at St Dubricius on Thursdays from 2 – 4pm. This is open to all and a warm welcome awaits you.

Whitchurch Floral Society meets at the Old Court on Wednesday 14th February at 6.45pm.
This will be the AGM

followed by a talk by Alan G. Wells whose subject will be
‘Tulip Mania’.

Bingo at the Old Court is on Tuesday February 6th at 7.30pm

MEMORIAL HALL ACTIVITIES

On Friday 23rd February
Flicks in the Sticks presents “Pecking Order” This quirkily entertaining documentary looks behind the scenes at competitive poultry breeding in New Zealand, mocking the foibles of, but never poking fun at this endearingly eccentric bunch of breeders. As for the chickens, they are fed hazelnuts for glossy feathers and blowdried for maximum uf ness! Judging the beauty contest is a joy to watch.

Doors open from 7pm for licensed bar. 7.30pm start. £5 entry.

Jazz For all Jazz lovers there are two new dates for the diary:

The rst event will be on Saturday 24th February and will feature the

Cass Casswell Jazz Band with Sinead McCabe. Sinead is a very popular vocalist and this is a very experienced band of rst class musicians form the Bristol area, not to be missed!

We are also pleased to welcome back “Hot Fingers” who have delighted our audiences on several occasions recently. Please note the revised date of Friday May 4th.This is sure to be a sellout, book early.

Jazz tickets are £15 pp which includes a light supper. Book with Colin 01600 890640.

 

Useful Links

The Aisle, St. Dubricius church

A History from Wikipedia

A History from the Celtic e-Library

A History from A Celtic Collective

The Gwillim Simcoe Story

Visit Herefordshire churches

The Old Court Hotel

Whitchurch CE Primary School Herefordshire

Kingfisher River Cruises Symonds Yat East

norton-house.com B&B Whitchurch

portlandguesthouse.co.uk

Amazing Hedge Puzzle, Whitchurch

Wyenot.com, A Photographic tour of news and views in the Wye Valley

Gwillim Grave Enclosure

The west side of the churchyard contains the Gwillim tomb. The Gwillims, who owned the Old Court, Whitchurch from 1600 to 1868, were benefactors of the church. Thomas Gwillim, who built the grave enclosure, had from his family of six only one grandchild, Elizabeth Posthuma, who was the daughter of his son Colonel Thomas Gwillim. Elizabeth was a remarkable woman who at 19 years old married John G. Simcoe, future first Governor of Upper Canada and founder of Toronto.

More information on 
www.gwillim-simcoe-story.co.uk
Banner from the gwillim simcoe story

The Wye Reaches Benefice